Anderson:

A: 3737 S. Scatterfield Rd., Suite 200, Anderson, Indiana 46013

P: (765) 640-1330


Indianapolis:

A: 10475 Crosspoint Blvd., Suite 234, Indianapolis, Indiana 46256

P: (317) 793-2015

Monthly Archives: June 2017

Revenge Porn and Nonconsensual Pornography in Indiana

With the advent of cell phones and social media, the disclosure of sexually explicit images without one’s consent has become a real problem.  This “revenge porn” or nonconsenual pornography can have devastating consequences one’s self, from simple embarrassment, to adverse consequences to their professional development at work, to suicidal thoughts or even suicide.

As a panelist for the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, I get quite a few calls, mainly from women, who have had nonconsensual pornography disclosed.  If you or a loved one are a victim of revenge porn, the first advice is always to document and preserve the disclosure. This is potential evidence in a civil or criminal case against the person(s) who disclosed it. There are some specific techniques that I often suggest, but many cases are somewhat fact specific.

Victims of the disclosure of revenge porn have a number of remedies under Indiana law.  Oftentimes the victim could file a lawsuit alleging invasion of privacy and the intentional infliction of emotional distress.  The disclosure of revenge porn may also be misdemeanor harassment in Indiana.  See Ind. Code § 35-45-2-2.

If you or you know somebody who has been affected by revenge porn, do not hestitate to call Alex Beeman at Beeman Law.  Our phone number is (765) 640-1330 and Alex’s email is alex@beemanlawoffice.com.

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THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT.  This blog is provided to you for informative purposes only and is not intended as legal advice you should act on alone, nor should it be considered a replacement for obtaining legal counsel and representation.  The information on this blog is not intended to create and use of this website alone does not establish an attorney-client relationship.  Do not send confidential information to Beeman Law unless you have been authorized to by an attorney at Beeman Law. 


Filing Bankruptcy May Help Your Credit Score

Creditors (e.g. credit card companies) use your credit score to adjudge whether to issue you any credit or to affix the rate of credit that they might be willing to give you.

A new analysis sheds some hopeful light on filing bankruptcy and its effect on your credit score.  The analysis

Paul Goldsmith-Pinkhams, an economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, reviewed successful and unsuccessful bankruptcy filers and the effect bankruptcy had on their credit score and worthiness after bankruptcy.

Most filers see their credit score drop substantially prior to filing bankruptcy (no surprise!). However, the good news is that generally filers saw their credit scores partially recovery immediately after a successful bankruptcy.

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The reason, as Paul Goldsmith-Pinkhams explains:

For successful Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 filers, the recovery likely stems from the successful discharge of debt—many delinquent debts are removed from the report upon filing, which leaves the debtor better positioned to repay remaining or new debts—as well as the fact that filing for bankruptcy puts limits on a person’s ability to file again in the near future. . . . Over time, debtors continue to rebuild their credit back to initial levels, and at flag removal (seven years for successful Chapter 13 and ten years otherwise), there is a bump in credit scores. This bump is largest for the successful filers—jumping from around 610 to 620—and smallest for the unsuccessful Chapter 13 filers.

If you have questions about your credit report, including the veracity thereof, or are just contemplating filing bankruptcy, please give us a call at (765) 640-1330 or email Alex Beeman at alex@beemanlawoffice.com.

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THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT.  This blog is provided to you for informative purposes only and is not intended as legal advice you should act on alone, nor should it be considered a replacement for obtaining legal counsel and representation.  The information on this blog is not intended to create and use of this website alone does not establish an attorney-client relationship.  Do not send confidential information to Beeman Law unless you have been authorized to by an attorney at Beeman Law.